30th October 2013

Photo reblogged from gastrogirl with 514 notes

gastrogirl:

easy dia de los muertos cakes.

gastrogirl:

easy dia de los muertos cakes.

28th October 2013

Photo reblogged from s u n a n d m i n t . with 32 notes

28th October 2013

Photo reblogged from melting mercurys with 4 notes

28th October 2013

Photo reblogged from colorful life with 17 notes

enjoycolorfullife:


Repinned via Dani Tousignant

enjoycolorfullife:

Repinned via Dani Tousignant

28th October 2013

Photo reblogged from Just gotta love cats with 9 notes

xxxgottalovecatsxxx:

free or happy on We Heart It. http://weheartit.com/entry/83724986/via/bad_barbie_girl

xxxgottalovecatsxxx:

free or happy on We Heart It. http://weheartit.com/entry/83724986/via/bad_barbie_girl

2nd October 2013

Photo reblogged from I'm a stupid human bean with 999 notes

Source: myviewfromsomewhere

2nd October 2013

Photo reblogged from I'm a stupid human bean with 1,909 notes

rrozabelikov:

Fantastical Creatures + The Modern Witch Part I

rrozabelikov:

Fantastical Creatures + The Modern Witch Part I

Source: millymcaulay

2nd October 2013

Photo reblogged from Roadside Sunflower with 7,951 notes

Source: enchanting-autumn

1st September 2013

Photo reblogged from Lily-Cats with 83,279 notes

come-as-you-are154:

i love this

come-as-you-are154:

i love this

Source: incipientt

1st September 2013

Photoset reblogged from Swords & Arrows with 2,205 notes

abinferis:

Criatura del Bosque

Source: flickr.com

1st September 2013

Photo reblogged from I'm a stupid human bean with 198 notes

blackpaint20:

I always saw myself in this
Albert-Joseph Pénot, Départ pour le Sabbat 
1910The postcard, from which this image is taken, has the caption “Salon d’Hiver.” This was one of the famous art salons of Paris.Numerous postcards were issues immediately before WWI with artwork by Pénot, photographically reproduced—like this one—from paintings he exhibited at the Parisian art salons. A few of these paintings/postcards seem to have used the same model as “Depart pour le Sabbat”. Pénot found some success painting for postcard publishers, with numerous, less ambitious, paintings being reproduced in colour (including a set of seven ‘Études de nu’).The fall of the model’s hair suggests she is travelling rump-first (but with the broom travelling in the right direction; that is, from right-to-left); her pose suggests she is travelling face-first (but with the broom travelling in the wrong direction; that is, from left-to-right): all very confusing. The solution to this may be that Pénot is indebted to a sixteenth-century tradition among German artists of depicting witches with their hair flying in the opposite direction to the way they are travelling (see Jane Davidson The Witch in Northern European Art, 1470-1750 (Luca Verlag, 1987), p.18). Davidson does not explain this tradition. Perhaps it was to show how un-natural, inverted, or contrary to nature, the witch was in the minds of German artists.Source

blackpaint20:

I always saw myself in this

Albert-Joseph Pénot, Départ pour le Sabbat 

1910

The postcard, from which this image is taken, has the caption “Salon d’Hiver.” This was one of the famous art salons of Paris.

Numerous postcards were issues immediately before WWI with artwork by Pénot, photographically reproduced—like this one—from paintings he exhibited at the Parisian art salons. A few of these paintings/postcards seem to have used the same model as “Depart pour le Sabbat”. Pénot found some success painting for postcard publishers, with numerous, less ambitious, paintings being reproduced in colour (including a set of seven ‘Études de nu’).

The fall of the model’s hair suggests she is travelling rump-first (but with the broom travelling in the right direction; that is, from right-to-left); her pose suggests she is travelling face-first (but with the broom travelling in the wrong direction; that is, from left-to-right): all very confusing. The solution to this may be that Pénot is indebted to a sixteenth-century tradition among German artists of depicting witches with their hair flying in the opposite direction to the way they are travelling (see Jane Davidson The Witch in Northern European Art, 1470-1750 (Luca Verlag, 1987), p.18). Davidson does not explain this tradition. Perhaps it was to show how un-natural, inverted, or contrary to nature, the witch was in the minds of German artists.

Source

Source: blackpaint20

1st September 2013

Photo reblogged from I'm a stupid human bean with 1,674 notes

Source: superbnature

31st August 2013

Photo reblogged from A Perfumed Pearl with 308 notes

rosefoil:

"A gentleman is simply a patient wolf." - Lana Turner

rosefoil:

"A gentleman is simply a patient wolf." - Lana Turner

Source: alterochris

31st August 2013

Photo reblogged from A Perfumed Pearl with 219 notes

Source: kittypackards

31st August 2013

Quote reblogged from Lily-Cats with 369,648 notes

We assume others show love the same way we do — and if they don’t, we worry it’s not there.
— Unknown (via ugh)

Source: psych-facts